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Government Plans Legislation To Curb International Student Influx

The federal government is set to implement legislation aimed at controlling the influx of international students into the country’s universities and colleges.

This move comes amidst concerns over rising migration numbers and a housing crisis.

According to data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the number of internal students visa applications rose to 35,000 in March.

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Meanwhile, Labour seeks to amend the Education Services for Overseas Students Act, granting the education minister authority to set limits on enrollments, even within specific courses or locations.

The proposed measures extend beyond enrollment caps, with anticipated budgetary changes including an escalation in non-refundable student visa fees and heightened financial requirements for visa applicants.

These developments have triggered an urgent meeting, where federal ministers will consult with the government’s expert advisory group on international education.

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International Education Association of Australia boss Phil Honeywood said: “This comes off the back … off English language entry levels already being lifted a couple of months ago … it also comes off the back of student visa fees in this week’s budget to be almost doubled, making it expensive student visa destination in the world.”

He also warned against the potential pitfalls of implementing such measures without thorough consultation.

We’re worried how the government is going to be able to negotiation with 1,400 international education colleges, let alone 39 public universities to agree on different numbers, bearing in mind this is going to be based on what courses we want.”

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