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All The Facts On The Southern Hemisphere’s First Cryonics Facility

Unless you’ve roadtripped on the Hume Highway between Sydney and Melbourne, chances are you haven’t heard of the small town of Holbrook.

Well, it’s about to become a town known by a few more people, particularly those seeking eternal life, after the first cryonics facility in the Southern Hemisphere opened in the twon back in February.

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On today’s episode of The Briefing, director of Holbrook’s Southern Cryonics, Peter Tsolakides takes us through what exactly cryonics is and what the facility’s members have signed themselves up to.

What is cryonics?

Chances are you’ve made it this far down the article and still actually don’t know what cryonics is.

Peter explains it simply for those who have never heard of it.

“It’s the preservation of a person after legal death… at very low temperatures”

“[The expectation] that in the future, medicine, science and technology will be able to replair the person and restore them to health and a young body.”

Why Holbrook?

With cryonics labs in places like the US and Russia, it seems a bit random that Holbrook was chosen for the first in the Southern Hempisphere.

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Peter says there were a lot of factors in determining Holbrook as the facility’s location.

“We had to check out an area that was very low in risk, fire hazard, earthquake risk and flooding. We found Holbrook met the conditions that we had,” Peter explained.

“There was also got a very good reception from the local council there. They were very happy for us to be there.

“And obviously it’s not the easiest think to build where you’re storing people who have passed away.”

Want to find out more? Listen to today’s episode of The Briefing where Peter explains costs, the types of cryonics customers, logistics, and more!

Subscribe to The Briefing, Australia’s fastest-growing news podcast on Listnr today. The Briefing serves up the latest news headlines and a deep dive into a topic affecting you. All in under 20 minutes.