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Queensland Introduces Stricter Laws For E-Scooter Riders

E-scooter riders in Queensland are facing stringent new laws that mandate their presence at the scene of accidents and potentially impose fines exceeding $6,000 for reckless behaviour. 

The legislation, proposed by Transport and Roads Minister Mark Bailey, emphasised the need for e-scooter riders to share the same post-accident responsibilities as drivers and cyclists.

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The new rules could result in court appearances and fines of up to $6,192 for e-scooter riders. 

“They are equally culpable in the same way that every other road user is, and I think most people would expect that that’s fair enough,” Mr Bailey said.

Despite the current nationwide speed limit of 25 km/h for e-scooters, speeding remains a concern. 

“When I get my running shoes out on the Bicentennial bike way and I get passed by an e-scooter doing about 50 or 60km/h – if it hit me I’d be dead,” he said.

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Under the proposed legislation, it would be an offence for e-scooters or bike riders to recklessly ride on footpaths, bike paths, or shared paths. Additionally, they would be required to stay at the accident scene, similar to motorists.

Previously, laws applied to e-scooter riders while on the road, but not while riding on footpaths. 

The legislation builds on regulations introduced last year, reducing the maximum speed limit on footpaths to 12 km/h.

“So let’s not underestimate the risk to pedestrians of an e-scooter ridden recklessly.”

According to data collected by Queensland’s transport department, in 2023, only one person died while riding an e-scooter, compared to 246 fatalities among individuals in cars, trucks, or motorcycles.

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