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Bond

These Famous James Bond Gadgets Actually Exist In Real Life

James Bond films are notorious for incorporating futuristic gadgets into 007’s arsenic of tools since the first Bond film was released in 1963. 

From jetpacks to explosive pens and “Dentonite” toothpaste, Bond’s gadgets appear to get more farfetched with every 007 adaption; but with significant advancments in technology, how farfetched are they really?

We can probably start by ruling out the possibility of explosive toothpaste, but we can look a little closer at the franchise’s frequent use of lasers. 

In Goldfinger, Sean Connery’s adaption of Bond, we see 007 strapped to a gold table with a bright red laser cutting through the table and up towards his groin; well according to Cosmos magazine journalist Matthew Agius, this bright red laser is entirely a fictional creation.

In fact, while this red laser isn’t real, powerful laser canons capable of taking out drones and other large equipment have been developed by the US Navy. 

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The US Navy use these laser canons because they tend to be more accurate and safer than regular ammunition but are most definitely not bright red. These lasers are actually invisible with similar lasers used in a later Bond film to blow up an enemy aircraft.  

Lasers aren’t the only gadgets to be developed in real life, with fingerprint scanners now used for purposes as mundane as unlocking our smartphones along with facial recognition used for similar purposes. 

Jake Morcom is joined by Cosmos Magazine journalist Matthew Agius to discuss which of the many 007 gadgets have made it off screen and into our reality thanks to ever advancing technology. 

Tune into the full episode of The Science briefing below… 

Introducing The Science Briefing: a podcast about the science of everything and your new go-to podcast for your snapshot of science news. Hosted by Dr Sophie Calabretto and featuring journalists from Cosmos Magazine.